Donga Tallidandruluntaru Jagratta

10 03 2016

DongaTallidandruluntaruJagratta600This latest book by Ranganayakamma is about abusive, selfish, and unloving parents. As I read the first few pages, I was so shocked and disturbed by the way the protagonist is treated by her parents. It took me some time to recover and compose myself. Even though such parents do exist and may not be rare, it’s harder to accept the fact at the outset. Male chauvinism, the author’s primary forte, on the other hand, is not so shocking. I think it’s because the former is less prevalent than the latter. It is common knowledge that many fathers can be abusive, but abusive mothers are far uncommon. This novel portrays two such mothers and how they damaged their children.

This is the story of “Parvathi”, who has the misfortune to be born to cruel parents, who consistently abused her physically, and emotionally. The only saving grace is her grandmother, who is the epitome of love. She grew up under her influence to be a matured, loving, and righteous person. However, the same cannot be said about her sister. She became as self-centered, cunning, and hateful as her parents. Parvathi’s mentally unstable husband also suffered a lot by his mother. In fact, she was the one who caused his illness and led him to pitiful death. All for money.

In the preface, the author claimed that the ultimate takeaway from this book should be that children should beware of such abusive parents and try to protect themselves from being exploited. In many cases it so happens that people who were abused in turn abuse others. A daughter-in-law abused by her tyrant mother-in-law in turn becomes a tyrant when she becomes a mother-in-law. Likewise, people who were abused by their parents in turn abuse their children. It doesn’t make logical sense, but that’s how psychology works in many cases. In this book, the author calls for people to break that vicious cycle, and become better parents instead.

Like in many of her other novels, the author adds some communist stuff in this book towards the end for good measure. She is a great believer of the communist philosophy and I always wonder. For me capitalism makes sense. I agree that it’s not perfect and lends itself to misuse resulting in an unbalanced society. But I’m skeptical about communism being the solution. Maybe I should read the books suggested by her -Srama Dopidi and  Capital – and then decide which one I prefer – communism or capitalism.

One thing I want to point out is that the novel depicts almost all characters as white or black; they are either good or bad. The bad – abusive parents in this case, can be always counted on behaving like the most disgusting people. And the good – the protagonist and her friends – always act in the most virtuous manner. I understand such people do exist and also that it is important to depict the characters as such in order to drive the point home. However, I believe that most people fall in between the white-black spectrum. The goodness/badness may vary with time, circumstances, or situations. How should one deal with such people, who are bad in only a few aspects? I know that technically speaking, even a minuscule of bad makes someone bad. But all such people may not be beyond salvation. I hope the author writes about such people, which a large number of readers can relate to and thereby benefit from their stories.

Advertisements

Actions

Information

2 responses

22 03 2016
Sreevani Sushma Vadlamudi

I would love to read it. where did you get the copy?

8 05 2016
sireeshaavvari

I purchased ebook from Kinige.com

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: