Badrinath

13 07 2011

I thought I could get away not having to watch Badrinath but it is not to be so. My husband and my son insisted that we go and so did we go. Well, keeping the expectations to the minimum certainly helped a lot. Thanks for all those negative reviews. ๐Ÿ™‚

The most violent/grotesque scenes were censored (made white) and I can’t thank enough those who are responsible for the censorship for saving me from a lot of wincing and subsequent nightmares.

The movie starts with a great promise acquainting the audience about the greatness of cultural heritage and the need to preserve them at any cost. But with the heroine falling in love with the hero, everything changes. Suddenly love (b/n a man and a woman) takes a supreme stand.

The characters are not well developed. The most irritable of all is that of heroine. She is so selfish and stupid that she can perceive nothing except her feelings for the hero. She is just a brainless barbie doll. In fact, characters like this are not new in Indian Cinema and the movies have indulged them like anything since ever.ย  Just being in love is perceived as a qualification and the mere fact that one sincerely (??) loves a person makes one entitled to get him/her whatever may be the circumstances. They glorify “love” like anything. The message they seem to convey seems to be – Being in Love is the noblest of all states. I believe that it’s true but only when you extend that love to the world and God.

All our scriptures proclaim that the highest achievement for any person is to become enlightenedย  and raise to a higher level. And the worldly pleasures/duties were meant to be experienced with a certain sense of detachment: Live in this world like a water drop on the lotus leaf. One’s duty always comes first. It’s another matter whether I agree with all the above or not, but since the movie deals with our culture, I guess it’s not entirely unrelated to reiterate the essence of our religion here.

The whole premise of the story that the love of a girl for the boy is nobler than the esteemed duty of the boy to his guru/god is not so convincing.

Even the hero’s character is not strong. His preferences are not shown explicitly, in an attempt to make him appear agreeable to both his lover and his guru. Also the guru’s character is not very good. His dialogue that – “I can make anyone my successor but no one can replace you as the girl’s lover” did not sound well to my ears. The reason why the guru has selected the hero as his successor is because he believed he’s the best person to take that responsibility. Any other choice would have been a compromise.

The threat that the girl would die if she is not allowed to unite with her lover is seen as the power/intensity of her love. What the hell? That might be true but is it only for love? Surely, the alternative that life has in store for her is worse. I don’t mean to be too hard on her but it seems to me that she is just selfish and desperate.

And it was so insolent of her to take the guru’s name and confront him demanding him to release his disciple. Not even for a moment she thought from the guru’s or the hero’s perspective. She did not pause to think what are the stakes on the other side. It’s she who came from elsewhere and disturbed their lives.

And all through the movie, the hero remains ambivalent. What about his love for the heroine? Is it as strong/intense as the heroine’s? No clue. Even in the end, he comes back to the heroine only on the guru’s command. What is he? A puppet? Of course, it’s all guru-sentiment but still it all seemed contrived.

Badrinath had been a rude shock after the classy 180. The heroine exposed her flesh in almost “every” frame of her. I had to remind myself that it’s a mass movie. ๐Ÿ™‚

The songs are all noisy. I liked only one – “Amba Dari”. The dances are good.

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6 responses

13 07 2011
Silpa

Hmm.. that bad huh? I will wait for DVD.. the other day I rented Orange dvd and was so determined to watch it till the end just to see how bad the movie was(based on -ve reviews). It is horrible.. I could only watch 40 min of that senseless movie. I hope Badrinath isnt that bad ๐Ÿ™‚

13 07 2011
sireeshaavvari

Of course Badrinath is more tolerable than Orange. The concept of Orange is so confusing and absurd that it has no match. ๐Ÿ™‚ Badrinath is just stupid. But Orange is confusing and dangerous. Lol!

16 08 2011
Deepu

LOL!! seriously LOL reading your post!

“what the hell?” LOL!

16 08 2011
sireeshaavvari

๐Ÿ™‚ Really, what the hell !!

18 05 2012
Sirisha Avvari

Heyy hi, you definitely do not know me. I stumbled onto this blog concidentally. You are my namesake, or I am your…

Anyways it so happened that I googled for my name and was jobless enough at that point of time to go to the google search pages 2 and 3 too. And thus I landed up here.

Speaking of badrinath though, I don’t know if I can find fault with the heroine character as such. She was meant to be a distraction, and played being one really well. I would blame the story writer, it was like a few of my stories where my enthusiasm to write either dampened or the pressure to deliver the story was too much to handle. And thus, a promising story – gone in the ash can! And of course, the director couldn’t get out of his stereotype either.

It’s been long since I actually ‘liked’, let alone ‘loved’ a telugu movie of big stars…
These days I only go to watch Allari Naresh’s movies, for some good laughs in senseless humour. I guess that is all that is left to look forward to.

19 05 2012
sireeshaavvari

Hi, it’s nice to encounter my namesake. Welcome to my blog!

About the movie, I commented only on the character or role, the way it is crafted by the creator (director, story-writer), and not the actor who played it. I had problem with only the role. Also, I must admit I feel that Tammanna’s face can express irritation, frustration, arrogance etc much better than any other emotions and that makes audience to hate the role even more. ๐Ÿ™‚

I agree with you about the state of ‘big’ cinema in Tollywood. But the good news is that the small cinema has reached new heights.

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